fuckingrapeculture:

[Transcript]

signifierofmalepower:

My picks from #safetytipsforladies on Twitter.

brilliant

(via shealreadydonehadherses)

PHOTOS: Naked Rowers Fighting Homophobia, One Nude Tweet At A Time [NSFW]

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: PHOTOS: Naked Rowers Fighting
Homophobia, One Nude Tweet At A Time [NSFW] via Queerty by Lester
Brathwaite on 6/28/13

Photo: Facebook

PHOTOS: If you aren’t following the garment-challenged gentlefellows of
UK’s Warwick Rowing Club on Twitter, it’s time to re-evaluate your life
choices. Well-known for their penchant for nudity in the name of
charity, the rowers are donating a portion of the funds raised from
their annual naked calendar to Ben Cohen’s anti-bullying StandUp
Foundation. And they like to give a little taste of the calendar via
their Twitter account — a sort of a-nude-bouche, if you will.
Meanwhile, this year, the ladies of Warwick are getting in on the
action for the first time, stripping down for a calendar of their own
with sales going towards Macmillan Cancer Support. Check out some
tweeted pics of the rowers in all their homoerotic glory — even better,
some of them are actually gay.

h/t: BuzzFeed
Next Photo » 1 of 13

12345678910111213
Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to Queerty using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: Telomere length influences
cancer cell differentiation via ScienceDaily: Latest Science News on
6/27/13
Researchers have discovered that forced elongation of telomeres
(extensions on the end of chromosomes) promotes the differentiation of
cancer cells, probably reducing malignancy, which is strongly
associated with a loss of cell differentiation.
Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to ScienceDaily: Latest Science News using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites
Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: Low self-control promotes
selfless behavior in close relationships via ScienceDaily: Latest
Science News on 6/27/13
When faced with the choice of sacrificing time and energy for a loved
one or taking the self-centered route, people's first impulse is to
think of others, according to new research.
Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to ScienceDaily: Latest Science News using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

Whole genome or exome sequencing: An individual insight

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: Whole genome or exome
sequencing: An individual insight via ScienceDaily: Latest Science News
on 6/26/13
Focusing on parts rather than the whole, when it comes to genome
sequencing, might be extremely useful, finds new research. The research
compares several sequencing technologies in the same individual with
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), and shows that sequencing the coding
regions alone at high depth of coverage can identify the genetic
variation behind this disease, and was also able to resolve previous
ambiguities. Next generation sequencing for understanding human DNA
variation and genetic disorders is advancing in leaps and bounds.
Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to ScienceDaily: Latest Science News using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

Gimme That Old-Time Religion: A Growing Number of Greeks Bow To Zeus, Apollo…

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: Gimme That Old-Time Religion:
A Growing Number of Greeks Bow To Zeus, Apollo, and Hera via Friendly
Atheist by Terry Firma on 6/23/13

Talk about nostalgia!

Public Radio International has a pretty entertaining piece from Greece
about the Return of the Hellenes,

… a movement trying to bring back the religion, values, philosophy and
way of life of ancient Greece, more than 16 centuries after it was
replaced by Christianity.

Remember the good old days? Neither do they, but that doesn’t prevent
them from worshiping the dodecatheon, including the long-moribund
deities Zeus, Apollo, and Hera. The New Hellenes don’t pray to the old
gods, they say, but they do hold them worthy of veneration (as
representations of things like beauty, health, and wisdom), and some
revivalists offer them sacrifices such as flowers, fruit, milk, and
honey.

They also have a soft spot for the Greek hero Prometheus, who helped
humans by stealing fire from the gods. There’s an annual festival
dedicated to him, held each summer solstice. On Friday, the event was
kicked off by

… six runners — in full Greek battle gear — racing the six miles up
Mount Olympus, home of the gods, their shields and long spears clanking
as they go.

The New Hellenes consider Greece to be a country under Christian
occupation, and they chafe under a majority of more than 95% of the
population who identify as Greek-Orthodox followers of Jesus. The lack
of affection is mutual: in 2007, an official of the Orthodox Church
said the Hellenes were “a handful of miserable resuscitators of a
degenerate dead religion.”

When I first heard about them, I thought perhaps their intention was to
gently satirize (satyrize?) religion — to be Greek Pastafarians, if you
will — but that doesn’t appear to be the case. It’s true that followers
see the movement as a platform to complain about Christianity, and that
it attracts new recruits on the back of the financial and cultural
crisis that has gripped Greece since late 2009. But that doesn’t mean
that adherents are lacking in sincerity. The founder of the Return of
the Hellenes, Tryphon Olympios, explains that

… ancient Greece provides a model of a world where freedom of thought —
and freedom of religion — is paramount. “We want to develop a free
individual, free from superstitions and free from dogmas. No one tries
to impose on you how to worship your god or practice your faith.”

The New Hellenes have twice applied to the Greek religion ministry for
official status, and twice the application went nowhere. Until they
receive the government’s imprimatur, they are officially prevented from
holding mystical gatherings at Greece’s ancient temples. They also
can’t build their own because, in Greece, that requires the sign-off of
the local Orthodox bishop.

But their marginal status may improve as their numbers increase. The
movement already claims to have hundreds of thousands of supporters,
and it could grow to have real influence — Zeus willing.

Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to Friendly Atheist using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

Bam Fu taps into the iOS, Android markets for free

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: Bam Fu taps into the iOS,
Android markets for free via Joystiq by Jessica Conditt on 6/23/13
Bam fu, the next game from Fingle developer Game Oven Studios, is
available right now for free on iOS and Android devices. It’s a
fast-paced multiplayer game where each player tries to out-tap his
rivals and secure the most pebbles. It’s simple, but could settle some
pretty major arguments.

Game Oven is already at work on a side project, which the team aims to
spend just one week developing. It’s a minimalistic, two-player-only
game that Game Oven founder Adriaan de Jongh teases with the following
image: two circle icons with fancy hats and the prompt, “hold longest
to win.” Again, simple - but absurdly intriguing.
Bam Fu taps into the iOS, Android markets for free originally appeared
on Joystiq on Sun, 23 Jun 2013 21:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for
use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments
Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to Joystiq using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

Total amount of exercise important, not frequency, research shows

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: Total amount of exercise
important, not frequency, research shows via ScienceDaily: Latest
Science News on 6/20/13
Getting at least 150 minutes of exercise per week is paramount for
health but choosing how to schedule the exercise is not.
Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to ScienceDaily: Latest Science News using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

Last Chance To Apply: Are You America’s First ‘Most Original Stoli Guy’?

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: Last Chance To Apply: Are You
America’s First ‘Most Original Stoli Guy’? via Queerty by Oscar
Raymundo on 6/21/13

Are you passionate, genuine and original? This is the moment you’ve
been waiting for. Show what makes you most original for a chance to be
the next face of Stoli.

GayCities is now taking applications for The Most Original Stoli Guy.
Deadline to submit your photo is this Sunday, June 23 at midnight.

Six contestants from each city will be selected take the stage in Stoli
Guy events coming this summer to Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco,
Chicago, Miami, Dallas, Boston, Washington D.C., Denver, San Diego,
Philadelphia, Asbury Park and Saugatuck.

One finalist from each city will travel to New York City and compete to
appear in an Andrew Christian original video that will premiere
exclusively here on Queerty!

Applying is quick and simple — just submit your most original selfie
and fill out some questions to distinguish yourself from the pack.

APPLY NOW

Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to Queerty using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

The Red Queen was right: Life must continually evolve to avoid extinction

Sent to you by Sizzle via Google Reader: The Red Queen was right: Life
must continually evolve to avoid extinction via ScienceDaily: Latest
Science News on 6/20/13
Biologists quote Lewis Carroll when arguing that survival is a constant
struggle to adapt and evolve. Is that true, or do groups die out
because they experience a run of bad luck? Biologists tested these
hypotheses using mammals that arose and died out (or are now dying out)
in the past 66 million years, and found that it’s not luck but failure
to adapt to a deteriorating environment.
Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to ScienceDaily: Latest Science News using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites